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The Yellow Perch is a freshwater fish native to much of North America. It is closely related to the European perch; and is sometimes considered a subspecies of it. Other common names for yellow perch include ringed perch, American perch, striped perch, lake perch, raccoon perch, coontail, and ring-tail perch.When I was growing up from 1957 to 1970 on a 13,000 acre Midwestern lake, none of the local anglers used artificial flies for Yellow Perch. It was a game of live bait-fish, or spinners and spoons. Of course, I was the only fly fisherman in my village so that was...

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I could easily choose a "one Fly" if I wished. It will likely imitate nearly the largest, commonest most popular pattern in the eyes of the fish. The so-called commodity fly.

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Trout are cold-blooded creatures, and active in relatively cold water conditions. Generally trout need water temperatures between 35 and 75 degrees to survive. And just as in summertime angling, the stream thermometer will give you an idea of how productive winter and spring fishing may be (see the chart, below).TEMPERATURE: EFFECT ON TROUT:80c Lethal to trout70 Trout seeking cold springs and tributaries65 Feeding slow60-63 Optimum temperatures55 Trout become active & looking upward toward water surface40-50 Trout sluggish, feed sporadically and look for food on stream bottomIMHO, the ideal flies for cold water angling are such creations as the Killer Bugger, Midge...

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One view of a strange topic - Angling and Instinct I claim no special knowledge within the realm of scientific phenomenon. In fact I failed biology. I only know what I have learned reading books by my heroes, in observing the efforts of others, and living my own experiences while catching headwaters trout. What works for me and what doesn't. Included in that list would be: 1. How to skip school to attend an early Mayfly hatch and, 2. What I can only call intuition or instinct. Many authors have addressed this subject over the centuries. Ray Bergman walked me...

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Fly fishing downstream for trout in small tributaries was the first angling method that I practiced as a wide-eyed youngster. Weekends and summer vacations would find me flailing my coarsely tied fly at eager little rainbows. In reality, it has become my method of choice wherever I can practically employ it. And most happily on little blue-line tributaries where the tactic really shines, and may likely be the only reasonable plan of attack. I have found that I can get my kebari just as deep as in upstream presentations, but with better control and (I feel) a more natural drift....

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